Irish dairy ingredients specialist Carbery is marketing a “clean tasting” hydrolysed whey protein range aimed at the sports nutrition market after completing sensory studies in conjunction with the North Carolina State University (NCSU).

Irish dairy ingredients specialist Carbery is marketing a “clean tasting” hydrolysed whey protein range aimed at the sports nutrition market after completing sensory studies in conjunction with the North Carolina State University (NCSU).

Its offering Optipep is a blend of whey-derived di- and tri-peptides it says are suited to recovery from exercise and muscle building. It sys claims of this type can be made by products employing Optipep.

“By evolving our Optipep range, we are now offering our customers what is believed to be one of the best tasting hydrolysed whey proteins (HWP) on the market”, said Bridget Holmes, the innovation project manager at Carbery in a statement.

“Our industry leading research into HWP flavour profiles with NCSU, which started last year, included benchmark work comparing a range of leading products in the market place and is the first in-depth study of its kind. Focusing on HWPs, the study allowed us to evolve Optipep’s taste profile and ensure best-fit as an ingredient for sport and fitness-related nutrition from a sensory perspective.”

Tools

The company said the NCSU testing had provided it with a set of tools to better understand how to formulate whey extracts to make them cleaner tasting. Enzyme technology was the principle mechanism that allowed the bitterness typically associated with hydrolysis to be reduced.

Holmes said Carbery’s sports division, Carbery Sports, was demonstrating some of the advances the company had made with a range of formulations, “containing Optipep for sports nutrition manufacturers and retailers”.

The company said Optipep increased insulin response that stimulates the uptake of certain amino acids into the muscle, “promoting muscle protein synthesis and decreasing breakdown by inhibiting amino acid oxidation.”

Dairy innovation programme

Carbery joined an initiative called Food for Health Ireland (FHI), established last year, that includes Dairygold, Glanbia and the Kerry Group as well as Irish academic and government research organisations.

It has received funding of €22.5m – mainly from the government – for the identification and commercialisation of bioactive ingredients from milk that can be used to address “the world’s most pressing health issues”, which include infant development, obesity, immunity and heart health.